dcsimg
A Flash Developer Resource Site

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: The universal web sites (resolution that is)

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    109
    What is the best way to build a web site to insure that it looks good with all resolution settings?

    I ask cause I make a site that looks just perfect at 1024x768 but at 800x600 it looks like total crap.

    How do some of you go about this?

  2. #2
    FK Robot Wrangler

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    536
    i always design for 800x600. every non-designer friend i have that owns a computer uses 800x600 rez. it seems to be the default resolution selected for Windows. but i always try to design pages to adapt to smaller window sizes. sometimes even I don't view sites in a maximized browser window.

  3. #3
    FK Official Postman
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rockville, MD / UCSanDiego
    Posts
    827
    I design for somewher in the middle. with that, it looks equal on 800x600 and 1024x768. not too small, and not too big.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    109
    Ya I try to design for the 800x600 and 1024x768 but its a pain trying to get a site to look good in every resolution.


  5. #5
    FK Official Postman
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rockville, MD / UCSanDiego
    Posts
    827
    Originally posted by shagg
    Ya I try to design for the 800x600 and 1024x768 but its a pain trying to get a site to look good in every resolution.

    It is a pain, but worth it in the end. The client is happy, and you don't have to redo anything.

  6. #6
    FK Robot Wrangler

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    536
    and remember, you're not just designing for the client, you're designing for a lot of different users.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    843
    I guess 800x600 for non-designers and business

    and 1024 and up for graphics sites, and advanced.

    from memory:roughly!!

    market share is 50%+/- 800x600, and 35%+/- 1024+higher,
    640x480 3-4% - bascally dead, thank goodness.

    the rest % - misc. ?????


    Rogue

  8. #8
    Senior Moderator
    FKs Banning Machine
    GMF 's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    5,697
    Moved to Design and Graphics



    What screensize should you use

    What is the recommended size (height and width) to make a Flash movie?

    Determining the best size to create a Flash movie-
    Choosing a movie size is a decision that merits consideration. The larger the movie is displayed - when scaled to fit the browser window - the slower it will run, on any given platform. Performance is also dependent on screen resolution.

    If the movie size is absolute - using specified pixel dimensions - one has more control over the frame rate. If a movie is larger than the region that will display in a browser window at 640 by 480 resolution (see below for actual pixel dimensions of available area), some users will not be able to see the whole movie at once, and will have to scroll to see the other parts. If the movie is scaled to the browser window, the movie will run considerably slower than might might be expected on large displays.

    Another important factor, if scaling the movie, is the aspect ratio. The browser menus and toolbars are fixed pixel dimensions, and thus, are not proportional to the content window at different display resolutions. Choose the target display resolutions - ones that intended viewers are most likely to be using - and tailor the aspect ratio of the movie to that display resolution.

    Browser Sizing-
    The following sizes take into account the widths of various interface items to show available working space for an unscaled Flash movie.

    Internet Explorer 4-
    These measurements presume the user has a normal start menu, default menu, buttons, URL window, and status bar, vertical scrollbar 16 pixels wide (which may be discounted if scaling to fit, that is, add it to the widths shown below) and no horizontal scrollbar:

    640x480 - 620x318
    800x600 - 780x438
    1024x768 - 1004x606
    1280x1024 - 1260x862

    Netscape Navigator 3-
    These measurements presume the user has a normal start menu, default menu, buttons, URL window, and status bar, vertical scrollbar 16 pixels wide (which will appear whether scaling or not) and no horizontal scrollbar. Netscape also imposes a mandatory 10-pixel left and top margin if no frameset is used, so that must be subtracted from the following if not using framesets:
    640x480 - 620x300
    800x600 - 780x420
    1024x768 - 1004x588
    1280x1024 - 1260x844

    Netscape Navigator 4.07 & 4.5-
    These measurements presume the user has a normal start menu, default menu, buttons, URL window, and status bar, vertical scrollbar 16 pixels wide (which may be discounted if scaling to fit, that is, add it to the widths shown below) and no horizontal scrollbar):
    640x480 - 620x302
    800x600 - 780x422
    1024x768 - 1004x590
    1280x1024 - 1260x846

    Regardless of chosen aspect ratio, the following considerations apply:
    Using the full display dimensions (or aspect ratio) can be problematic. Always consider the true size of the window after the interface elements are displayed and use that size for the Flash movie.
    When scaling the movie with the ExactFit option, on some displays, the movie will be distorted (stretched horizontally or vertically). Using the Default (Show All) option, some browsers configurations may have part of the work area showing.
    Using the NoBorder option may cut part of the movie off, either horizontally or vertically, depending on the aspect ratio of the movie.


  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    843
    found this

    http://webdesign.about.com/compute/w...pollscreen.htm

    take the survey to see the totals

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    york
    Posts
    459
    why not try echoecho

    They tend to have statistics showing screen res, colour depth, os:
    plus they have ways to check your site in different res's

  11. #11
    FK Official Postman
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rockville, MD / UCSanDiego
    Posts
    827
    Originally posted by quistaquay
    why not try echoecho

    They tend to have statistics showing screen res, colour depth, os:
    plus they have ways to check your site in different res's
    very handy!

  12. #12
    hi,

    I worked on a website for a dotcom company for about a year. The site was aimed
    at the home user, the proverbial Average Joe, and attracted up to 50,000 unique visitors a month.

    During its life span of about 6 months (the site died with the dotcom downturn), the site attracted
    265,000 unique visitors. Therefore, the site's statistics are somewhat revealing as to what configuration the average user has on his/her machine.

    Here are some specs:

    Browsers:

    Internet Explorer 5: 80%
    Netscape 4: 10%
    Internet Explorer: 4: 8%

    Screen Resolutions:

    800 by 600: 55%
    1024 by 768: 32%
    640 by 480: 6%

    As you can see, a majority of users have 800 by 600 Screen Resolutions, with an interesting
    percentage at 1024 by 768. It is a good bet to design for 800 by 600 if you are aiming a website
    at average users. Those with higher rez will have some white space, but it's not as bad as
    designing a full interface at 1024 by 768 and then having 55% of users needing to scroll to
    the right and bottom to access navigation buttons and content.


    If you have Dreamweaver, open up a new empty page and click the "Window size" pull down menu
    (at the bottom of the empty page, near the series of colored palette icons). You'll see that
    Dreamweaver offers a couple of standardized page sizes for you to choose from. In there you'll find
    one called: "760 X 420 (800 X 600, Maximized)". Choose it and the window will resize to those
    dimensions. That's the one you want: you should design your interface so that it fits correctly into
    that 760 by 420 screen.

    As explained previously by GmF, that's because on a 800 X 600 screen, some real estate is taken up by the browser's window itself, with its contours, the scroll bar on the side, the location bar on top as well as the navigation tools buttons (back, forward, home, search etc).
    Also, under Windows, you must account for the Task Bar that takes up space at the
    bottom of the screen. So, by choosing to design your layouts for 760 by 420 screens
    (actual 800 X 600 screen real estate), you are safe: your content will fit on most monitor setups.



    [Edited by macmarts on 05-24-2001 at 11:04 PM]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




Click Here to Expand Forum to Full Width

HTML5 Development Center