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Thread: where do you draw the line

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    I recently submitted a short intro sample to a prospective client who wanted to accept the bid but wanted to make some revisions which I expect. After two weeks of him doing the Flash equivalent of trying on dresses for him to "just see" what it would look like, we ended up with virtually the original project I submitted. Since this is new for me I was willing to deal with it, but I was wondering if you all with more experience could let me know if this is normal or if you would put up with it?

    thanks
    cyk

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    It sort of depends on how hungry you are.
    A good idea is to allow a specified number of revisions at no charge (usually 2 or 3). After that, they should pay an hourly rate. This keeps from having to do frivolous stuff just because the client wants more choices.

  3. #3
    Ambassador of Style
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    I always submit 2-3 mocks right from the get-go and make it clear that the hours I put in are the hours I'm paid.

    It can be tougher when you are starting out though - and if this is the case, I recommend going along with it for this client. Not only is it helpful for your portfolio, it helps to learn to accept outside critisism - thinking you know best because you are the designer is crap. Granted, his/her ideas may have been awful, but at least you can use those failures for aguments sake with future clients (ie: "That's a great idea, but I actually tried that with my last client and here's why it didn't work...")

    -A02

  4. #4
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    Thanks for your advise guys, Agent02-you're right I did feel conflicted at times, wavering between feelings of annoyance that he would not take my designs at face value and feeling incompetant because I could not make the client happy, in the end I think he realized all his ideas were looking not too good, and he's pretty happy with end result. I really do think one of the hardest parts of designing is giving the customer what they want because most of the time it seems that they don't even know. Thats the only difference, for me, between art and design.
    Thanks again for your input
    cyk

  5. #5
    Senior Member Geoff Edwards's Avatar
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    One of the things that can be most difficult in these situations is that we tend to take ownership of our work. Try to keep in mind that we are contracted to please the client.

    On the other hand when he makes suggestions that you feel won't be in his best interest don't be shy about explaining why you did things the way you did them. If you have been doing what you are doing for a long time make sure he knows you are experienced. After a while you'll build a clientele that respects your work and is more accepting of your creativity.

  6. #6
    Moderator
    The Minister of No Crap

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    I am just now finishing a site for a client that is how you described. I started it back in April. I've really just bit the bullet and let him have his way for certain reasons, but I can't wait to get it done. It will be the last site I ever do like that again. I agree with Agent that you should do a few like this at first, but don't do the rest of your career like this. You'll go mad.

    -scott
    http://www.scottmanning.com

  7. #7
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    We never do full or semi-functional mockups..they are a waste of energy unless the client is paying for you R & D time.

    The more you interview your client ahead of time the better you can control this.

    Your mocks...should be photoshop shots..or links to other sites that revolve around the concept you are trying to communicate to them.

    They do not even have to be your sites..just examples. (you are not saying that they are sites you've done either..standard disclaimer)

    Control your wasted work if you can.

    2 Cents

    Tom

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