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Thread: client hates site....:-(

  1. #21
    tell me, is this sellable..... OddDog's Avatar
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    Hi Kaza I am in Spain and I have found generic contracts give no real protection. You will need a contract written with French law in mind.

    A generic US contract translated into French may look ok to a client but will not be legally defensable in France.

  2. #22
    Thank you all... this subject has been very enlightening.

    I am seriously considering offering my webdesign services on a professional basis but as I am somewhat inexperienced as a freelancer, I am looking anywhere I can for tips, experiences, etc... to gain a little insight before I even begin. Kaza,it must feel really bad to have someone not like your creation. I strongly agree with breur about facing the situation and I REALLY agree with having a contract, however I bet that a lot of clients out there prefer not to have a contract and prefer doing things in a casual manner. I think I'll go with the contract

    thanx

  3. #23
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    Freelance sites such as Guru and Elance offer contract advice (though I'm not sure if they have sample documents or not).

    Breur Media provides contract consultation, but only for US contracts at this time. (The Company's Vice President worked as contract manager for TRW and other government contractors and subcontractors in Southern California before moving here.)

    Once you have a good basic contract, you can reuse it again and again, just by modifying the timeline and services offered to fit each new job. Your contract will need to clearly state the responsibilities of BOTH YOU AND YOUR CLIENT, limit your liability, and indicate that you do not provide any warranties. (Again, see http://www.guru.com for clarification.)


    Also, a contract does not need to be full of "legalese", although such complex wording is there for a good reason -- to cover all possibilities and rule out "interpretation".

    Remember, the contract is for everyone's benefit, not just yours. If a client does not want to bother with a contract, point this out to them. Without the written contract, there is no proof of any promises made by either party. Agreeing to a written contract is another sign of "good faith" between the parties.

    While verbal agreements CAN work out just fine and everyone SHOULD trust everyone else, there are thousands and thousands of mediators, arbitrators, lawyers and judges at work right now--showing us that misunderstandings happen all the time, even when there ARE written contracts!

    Keep up the good work, all.

  4. #24

    good news!

    It worked! I did what you said and tried to reach the boss of the company to propose to make some changes to the site. I couldn't reach him and he never called me back, so on monday i called another guy, who is sort of the second in charge there. I told him about the situation, he was really sorry and we had a meeting this morning; I showed him the site and he liked it. he told me what changes had to be made. He wants me to do the second website and asked for a contract! he said i should have had one for the first site!
    He made me understand that the boss was very special and was like that with everybody. Actually I understood that the one in charge of all the practical things in the company was him and not the boss!
    He said he will do the nessecary talking with his boss to bring him to accept the first project and give the second one, and he had no doubt he will succeed!

    Thank you so much for advising me to try to finish and hang on to this work! TTTTTTTHHHHHAAAANNNNKKK
    you all!

    and breur, i will visit the site right away!

    caroline kaza

  5. #25
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    Cool WOO HOO!

    Congratulations! What a triumph!

    It just goes to show: Good things DO happen to good people!


  6. #26
    tell me, is this sellable..... OddDog's Avatar
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    congratulations

  7. #27
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    congrats

    Andrew

  8. #28
    thank u all!
    caroline! :-)))

  9. #29
    Pessimistic ebullience evan224's Avatar
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    Angry

    It really depends who was the client. If you were going to have a contract, which of the 2 guys would go down as the client? If it is the guy who liked it, then you are in the right, and you should charge his ass till the cows come home, if the client is the guy who didn't like it, then bad luck buddy. You really need to make the changes if the client wants them. He may be a bad client, not signing of over the design period ect, but he's the client none the less.

    E.

    Boy, it's been months since I've posted, damn work, it doesn't leave any time for goofing off!

  10. #30
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    Originally posted by kaza
    ok odd dog, i got that!
    i will certainly spend some time on that subject now!

    is it possible 4 me to put in a contract something like

    "the author will publish the pages done on .......(url), and will send an e-mail each time to the client. after a certain amount of days, if the client has not replied, it will mean the page is accepted and only minor changes will be possible..."
    No, in your contract you have designated sign-off points - such as after design stage, after stage 1 development...etc - and the client MUST signoff or you go no further with the project. If you can't get in contact then you do no more work. This is ESSENTIAL to ensure something like this is avoided.

    More details on this on another thread I've juyst posted on (with a simialr problem): http://board.flashkit.com/board/show...hreadid=216988

  11. #31
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    Yes,

    "Milestones" or check off points are really important so you do not wind up revisiting, or redesigning earlier elements at your own expense.

    -tg

  12. #32
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    Post

    im glad someone brought this up. just as important as contracts are comps and signoffs. before starting any project, you should comp out 3 static designs for your client so they can see what they are getting before any real work is done (in photoshop or whatever u use). then they can choose and tweak the comps until they get something they feel comfortable with. then have them sign off on the comps themselves and on the contracts "stage 1(comps), stage2(design), stage 3(tweak), stage 4(live)". this way, there will be no surprises when you have spent time on a site and your client is unhappy with everything.

    -Mitee

  13. #33
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    Indeed,

    It is kind of like the whole idea of preventing "original taint" like in evidence. Secure your work in stages and they cannot go back and ask to change "every graphic to green" or something without incurring an extra cost.

    It can actually bring in more revenue from a job, because if you can bill for it..so be it..it is in writing.

    We have milestone sign off sheets at http://www.proposakit.com/info.htm it is included in the package.

    Cheers & good luck.

    -tg

  14. #34
    Old Member gecko2's Avatar
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    If the clients viewed the site through progression of the project and approved what they saw then they should have no problem in paying you for your services.

    You're saying that one of the two company owners saw the site approved it and paid up, yet the other who never saw it until it was complete hated it?

    Don't do the changes for free. It sounds to me like if I was you I would explain the situation to the guy who hates it, with the guy who paid up that he was never around to see the site in early forms and for you to now turn around and change the site now is a big step involving cash.

    Say to him something like that you'll do the next site for them slightly cheaper and that they can both site down with you at intervals to discuss how the new site is progressing so everyone is happy and your integrity as a designer and businessman is upheld.

    We've done this before with slightly different circumstances and everyone was hunky-doory

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