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Thread: The web community drug. Take care!

  1. #1
    Information Architect Subway's Avatar
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    resolved

    http://www.techcentralstation.com/10...D=1051-041002D

    Recent research shows that Internet Addiction is just a special case of what might more broadly be called Communication Addiction. Most healthy individuals tend to spend their time doing normal, productive things like eating, sleeping, working, caring for their children, and having sex. But recently, some have started to devote an inordinate amount of time to the clearly far less valuable and more dangerous activity of Communication (and a related behavior, Information Gathering).
    Lounge lizards should especialy take care, or we soon need a spezial board for all of you.

    Fredi

  2. #2
    doesn't use scenes either
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    and thats true!

    I'm not eating while doing flash/internet. Other strange behaviour not occured yet and -thank god- having sex has still higher priority

    -----Vincenzo

  3. #3
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    What a disappointing article. I was expecting something more interesting. It's merely stating that "some" people "spend a lot of time online" and that they miss it when they're not online.

    It's not really news, I always figured the people that play these online games were worse for sitting in front of a PC than designers or lounge lizards.

    The healthy yellow rays from the FK boards have replaced sunlight haven't they ...

  4. #4
    Information Architect Subway's Avatar
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    Communication addiction is for sure better then "ego shooter" online addicted.

    Fredi

  5. #5
    Information Architect Subway's Avatar
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    Better article here:

    http://psychcentral.com/netaddiction/

    Do You Spend Too Much Time Online?
    In relation to what or whom? Time alone cannot be an indicator of being addicted or engaging in compulsive behavior. Time must be taken in context with other factors, such as whether you're a college student (who, as a whole, proportionally spend a greater amount of time online), whether it's a part of your job, whether you have any pre-existing conditions (such as another mental disorder; a person with depression is more likely to spend more time online than someone who doesn't, for instance, often in a virtual support group environment), whether you have problems or issues in your life which may be causing you to spend more time online (e.g., using it to "get away" from life's problems, a bad marriage, difficult social relations), etc. So talking about whether you spend too much time online without this important context is useless.


    What Makes the Internet So Addictive?
    Well, as I have shown above, the research is exploratory at this time, so suppositions such as what makes the Internet so "addictive" are no better than guesses. Since other researchers online have made their guesses known, here are mine.

    Since the aspects of the Internet where people are spending the greatest amount of time online have to do with social interactions, it would appear that socialization is what makes the Internet so "addicting." That's right -- plain old hanging out with other people and talking with them. Whether it's via e-mail, a discussion forum, chat, or a game online (such as a MUD), people are spending this time exchanging information, support, and chit-chat with other people like themselves.

    Would we ever characterize any time spent in the real world with friends as "addicting?" Of course not. Teenagers talk on the phone for hours on end, with people they see everyday! Do we say they are addicted to the telephone? Of course not. People lose hours at a time, immersed in a book, ignoring friends and family, and often not even picking up the phone when it rings. Do we say they are addicted to the book? Of course not. If some clinicians and researchers are now going to start defining addiction as social interactions, then every real-world social relationship I have is an addictive one.

    Socializing -- talking -- is a very "addictive" behavior, if one applies the same criteria to it as researchers looking at Internet addiction do. Does the fact that we're now socializing with the help of some technology (can you say, "telephone"?) change the basic process of socialization? Perhaps, a bit. But not so significantly as to warrant a disorder. Checking e-mail, as Greenfield claims, is not the same as pulling a slot-machine's handle. One is social seeking behavior, the other is reward seeking behavior. They are two very different things, as any behaviorist will tell you. It's too bad the researchers can't make this differentiation, because it shows a significant lack of understanding of basic behavioral theory.
    Fredi

  6. #6
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    Re: Better article here:

    Originally posted by Subway
    http://psychcentral.com/netaddiction/

    Do You Spend Too Much Time Online?
    In relation to what or whom? Time alone cannot be an indicator of being addicted or engaging in compulsive behavior. Time must be taken in context with other factors, such as whether you're a college student (who, as a whole, proportionally spend a greater amount of time online), whether it's a part of your job, whether you have any pre-existing conditions (such as another mental disorder; a person with depression is more likely to spend more time online than someone who doesn't, for instance, often in a virtual support group environment), whether you have problems or issues in your life which may be causing you to spend more time online (e.g., using it to "get away" from life's problems, a bad marriage, difficult social relations), etc. So talking about whether you spend too much time online without this important context is useless.


    What Makes the Internet So Addictive?
    Well, as I have shown above, the research is exploratory at this time, so suppositions such as what makes the Internet so "addictive" are no better than guesses. Since other researchers online have made their guesses known, here are mine.

    Since the aspects of the Internet where people are spending the greatest amount of time online have to do with social interactions, it would appear that socialization is what makes the Internet so "addicting." That's right -- plain old hanging out with other people and talking with them. Whether it's via e-mail, a discussion forum, chat, or a game online (such as a MUD), people are spending this time exchanging information, support, and chit-chat with other people like themselves.

    Would we ever characterize any time spent in the real world with friends as "addicting?" Of course not. Teenagers talk on the phone for hours on end, with people they see everyday! Do we say they are addicted to the telephone? Of course not. People lose hours at a time, immersed in a book, ignoring friends and family, and often not even picking up the phone when it rings. Do we say they are addicted to the book? Of course not. If some clinicians and researchers are now going to start defining addiction as social interactions, then every real-world social relationship I have is an addictive one.

    Socializing -- talking -- is a very "addictive" behavior, if one applies the same criteria to it as researchers looking at Internet addiction do. Does the fact that we're now socializing with the help of some technology (can you say, "telephone"?) change the basic process of socialization? Perhaps, a bit. But not so significantly as to warrant a disorder. Checking e-mail, as Greenfield claims, is not the same as pulling a slot-machine's handle. One is social seeking behavior, the other is reward seeking behavior. They are two very different things, as any behaviorist will tell you. It's too bad the researchers can't make this differentiation, because it shows a significant lack of understanding of basic behavioral theory.
    Fredi


    Much better The first one was very generalised and didn't really point out the obvious flaws in the research as the second one did.

    Interesting topic Fredi.

  7. #7
    Collision Resolution hollywood's Avatar
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    Angry

    Darn. I'll add that to my list. I've got:

    ADD
    Dislexyia
    Torrettes
    IAD
    OCB

    I might have Book Addiction too.

  8. #8
    Information Architect Subway's Avatar
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    Originally posted by hollywood
    Torrettes
    Sometimes I think that a lot of peples here have that when I read theyr posts.

    Fredi

  9. #9
    poet and narcisist argonauta's Avatar
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    evrybody gots an addiction. And I guess it's better to be addicted to internet than addicted to drugs.

    I admit it, I'm addicted to flash!!!!!

    argonauta.-7*

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