You have P2P status, which means you have a license to hack.
A Flash Developer Resource Site

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: You have P2P status, which means you have a license to hack.

  1. #1
    NerdInside's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Penguin Island
    Posts
    3,439
    http://computerworld.com/managementt...,72519,00.html
    License to Hack

    By FRANK HAYES
    JULY 08, 2002

    There are bad ideas, and then there are really awful ideas. Example of a bad idea: the proposed uniform state law called the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA), with its "self-help" provision that lets vendors remotely sabotage software you've bought if they believe you're not conforming to their license terms. That one is such a stinker that three states have actually outlawed UCITA provisions from being enforced.
    And a really awful idea? Try legalizing malicious hacking.

    That's what a Los Angeles congressman named Howard Berman has in mind. He's proposing a federal law that would let copyright holders use "technological self-help measures" against peer-to-peer networks like Kazaa, Morpheus and the now-moribund Napster in order to fight piracy of their copyrighted material.

    What kind of "self-help" would be legalized? Spoofs, redirection, file blocking, decoys, interdiction and, oh yeah, actually breaking into servers to plant malicious code.

    And what if a copyright holder causes additional damage or attacks the systems of someone who isn't actually misusing their copyrights? Berman's bill would protect them from being arrested or sued.

    Now let this sink in for a moment: This law is a license to hack, and hack maliciously - without any further government approval, without a court order, entirely at the discretion of the copyright holder.

    This is a terrible idea. Full disclosure: I've got no use for peer-to-peer networks where music and movies and software are pirated. My own copyrighted work has been ripped off on the Internet. My friends include the owners of several tiny music labels who hate the music-stealing networks with a passion and rejoiced when Napster went down. So I'm in a position to benefit from this license to hack.

    But I repeat: It's a truly awful idea. And not just because it would give a little moral justification to every overgrown juvenile delinquent who believes that "if it's OK for big movie studios to break into someone else's computer, then it's OK for me, too."

    It's also a bad law for us because even though it's aimed at peer-to-peer outfits like Kazaa and Morpheus, the next target will be corporate IT.

    Face it, there's no way to write a law that's sure to include all peer-to-peer pirates without defining things very broadly. So any copyright holder who's got a beef with any organization whose networks may be used to violate copyrights could claim this license to hack.

    So if some software vendor decides your company might have unlicensed software on its network - whether that's true or not - the vendor could break into your servers and rummage around. After all, the software vendor is a copyright holder, and that server is on a network.

    Sound crazy? Remember, Berman's idea is to leave this all to the discretion of the copyright holder. And some copyright holders are notorious for believing their rights extend far beyond what any court or lawmaker has ever approved. For software makers who want to have you in a hammerlock, this is like UCITA on steroids.

    And what if a competitor suspects you've acquired some of its copyrighted proprietary information? (Remember, the suspicion doesn't have to be true.) Does anyone think some companies wouldn't jump at the chance to hack into their rivals' networks legally, no matter how flimsy the pretext, and "self-help" themselves to whatever they can find?

    Berman says copyright holders are at a disadvantage against peer-to-peer pirates. That's absolutely true. Crooks always have an advantage - they don't obey the law.

    But the legal system shut down Napster for copyright infringement. That's the way to go after other peer-to-peer pirates too.

    There are already too many malicious hackers out there threatening our systems. Making any kind of electronic sabotage legal is a really, really awful idea.

    Frank Hayes, Computerworld's senior news columnist, has covered IT for more than 20 years. Contact him at frank_hayes@computerworld.com.


    Source: Computerworld
    I think this could be exploited too much. What is P2P file sharing? Is that FTP? Is that transfers over AIM/MSN/ect...? Or does this just apply to programs like Kazaa and WinMX? And who gets to do the hacking?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    183

    Smile

    Ya, I read about the RIAA's desire to start hacking into P2P users computers.

    I kind of liked the idea actually, not that I like the RIAA. But let's face it, the long arm of the law is only interested in bringing down kiddie porn baddies who hang out in AOL chat rooms and virus makers. Vary rarely does law enforcement bust people for anything else online.

    So, I say go back to the days of the wild wild west and get some guns for hire to go out and lynch some SOB. That's why they had vigilantes and dime a dozen deputees (and lone rangers), there was too much uncharted territory and there was no concrete system in place to allow for the law enforcement system we have today. So back then, they went out and took care of it themselves.

    And just think how much fun it could be...
    Yahoo and others could launch attacks against IRC channels known to be the hangout for script kiddies who launch DOS attacks. Sick of having to wait for the fed to bust loose with a sting operation against ecommerce hijackers? Go out and hire some white hats to nuke those guys off the net.
    Of course, Microsoft would probably ruin it all by launching massive attacks against any computer that wasn't running Windows. But, hey... That would give good reason for massive counter attacks against M$, and that in my book is A-OK.

    So ya, I think legal hacking is great, aughtta liven things up a bit.

  3. #3
    Senior Member CrashedStar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    197
    people just like to be in control - the internet is raw information, who can control that?!

    as for P2P hacking, when will the RIAA realise its not just america that uses the internet, different countrys - different laws

    cs

  4. #4
    NerdInside's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Penguin Island
    Posts
    3,439
    You bring up a good point. I bet (not sure on this) that a way around this law would be to proxy yourself with a different country, like the UK.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    u.k
    Posts
    113

    whatever happens, that congress guy is opening himself to get completely raped if he even pokes his nose through the e-door.

    not that its going to pass anyway...


  6. #6
    Juvenile Delinquent CVO Chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Ulster, UK
    Posts
    520
    Old news my friends. Posted about it ages ago.

    The worrying thing is that they are trying to sneak these laws in. Rather than doing things properly, they would fire this legislation in a 1000 page document about terrorism to "hide" it.

    I hate the RIAA. They are corporate scum who, IMHO, are alot worse than Microsoft will ever be. The politicians who back this out-dated organization, whether it be for money or who knows, shouldn't be in the position they are.

    RIAA = Scum.

  7. #7
    I think this is a great idea. The next bastard that steals one of my flash files, their server is going to crash and burn and legally!

    HACK THE PLANET!


  8. #8
    NerdInside's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Penguin Island
    Posts
    3,439
    Originally posted by fatguygoesnutzoid
    HACK THE PLANET!
    You have seen the movie 'Hackers' one to many times. I think it is time to call your mother in to smash the DVD.

  9. #9
    NerdInside's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Penguin Island
    Posts
    3,439
    And this would not apply to Flash files, just files shared over Peer-to-Peer apps.

  10. #10
    Originally posted by NerdInside
    Originally posted by fatguygoesnutzoid
    HACK THE PLANET!
    You have seen the movie 'Hackers' one to many times.
    Yes, once was one time too many. But Angelina Jolie was a hottie even back then.

    [updated, dumded down]MP3 THE PLANET![/updated, dumbed down]

  11. #11
    NerdInside's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Penguin Island
    Posts
    3,439
    I she never was really that hot. And the fasion in that movie didn't serve her well (but I could).

  12. #12
    Juvenile Delinquent CVO Chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Ulster, UK
    Posts
    520
    Hackers = Crap

    That's all I have to say

  13. #13
    MP3 P2Pers = crap
    Angelina Jolie = HOTTIE!!!

  14. #14
    Originally posted by l0ungeb0y

    And just think how much fun it could be...
    Yahoo and others could launch attacks against IRC channels known to be the hangout for script kiddies who launch DOS attacks. Sick of having to wait for the fed to bust loose with a sting operation against ecommerce hijackers? Go out and hire some white hats to nuke those guys off the net.
    Of course, Microsoft would probably ruin it all by launching massive attacks against any computer that wasn't running Windows. But, hey... That would give good reason for massive counter attacks against M$, and that in my book is A-OK.

    So ya, I think legal hacking is great, aughtta liven things up a bit.
    I think that's the best idea I've heard in a while! Vigilante hackers... You could even have like underground hacker squads for hire, it would be real hush hush though. Like hiring a hitman. I think we've got a good idea for a movie here!

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    23
    would that be starring angelina jolie then??

  16. #16
    Slackware 9.0 Runes_Tooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Crono Triggyarr
    Posts
    508
    Does no one else wonder how they know who has P2P and who doesn't?

  17. #17
    Originally posted by Runes_Tooth
    Does no one else wonder how they know who has P2P and who doesn't?
    Nope.

  18. #18
    NerdInside's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Penguin Island
    Posts
    3,439
    I think they would have "agents" on the big P2P apps (OpenNap, FastTrack, eDonkey). They would use packet scanning software to find out what IP you have and then hack you. OR they would put viruses in the files which you would be downloading. Not sure.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




Click Here to Expand Forum to Full Width


HTML5 Development Center

Poll by Flashkit.com