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View Poll Results: Do you want 3dfa for Linux and Macintosh in the near future?

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  • Yes

    7 63.64%
  • No

    4 36.36%
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Thread: Is 3dfa still being developed?

  1. #21
    Member
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    Jan 2003
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    63
    Macromedia has made a flash plugin for linux (http://download.macromedia.com/pub/..._6_linux.tar.gz), Adobe has put out a Linux version of Adobe Acrobat (http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html).
    These are not major apps, the Flash plugin is just that - a plugin, and it is Adobe Acrobat Reader that Adobe have released, not Acrobat itself. As I said, both Macromedia and Adobe are not porting their major apps to Linux and none of the other major software houses look set to take the plunge either.

    Everyone reading this should seriously consider trying Linux as a completely free OS.
    I wouldn't recommend Linux to anyone just because it is a free alternative to Microsoft, in fact I would let them know that they need to learn a whole lot of things about their computer and hardware before they consider trying Linux. You really need a lot of time and patience to figure certain things out.

    Here are a few of the problems from last time I tried Linux, which was with the last release of RedHat (9 I think) - the core of which became Fedora.

    1) It hung when when auto-detecting my soundcard.
    2) It hung when auto-detecting my firewire ports.
    3) My ADSL modem needed a driver downloading from the manufacturer's site but I couldn't get on line without my ADSL modem. Catch 22.
    4) Hardware acceleration was not supported on my graphics card.

    The solution to the soundcard was to go and download the ALSA project and install their drivers (which required compilation from source) instead of the core Linux ones. The solution to the firewire ports was to download a kernel patch and re-compile the kernel - not something that the average Windows user would like to do. The ADSL problem was solved by me still having Windows on my PC on another partition.

    Linux is not easy, it has a steep learning curve because you need to know so much more about your system than with Windows, it reminds me of early Windows 95 when Microsoft didn't quite have everything right with Plug & Play and there was a lot of legacy stuff. I think that's where Linux on the desktop is today, but 95 was 9 years ago - which is a long time in the computer industry.

    I am not trying to put Linux itself down, it is doing rather well as a server alongside UNIX and BSD, it could have a bright future on the desktop if the community listens to its critics rather than burying their heads back in 1973 - just look at what Apple have done with BSD. But I don't think it is in the right kind of shape at the moment, XFree development is split, desktop development is split (GNOME and KDE are really just duplicating each other), there is no common focus, and the reality of the situation is that RedHat have effectively pulled out of the Linux desktop market by creating the Fedora project to concentrate on servers.

    If people want to use Linux, fine, but just be aware that it isn't operating system utopia.

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Australia
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    24

    Linux

    kenlynch ---

    Ok... Linux doesn't have the support of many major companies, but that IS changing, however slowly.

    Granted: Linux requires a more in depth knowledge of computers to use it to its full potential, but you can use it with minimal knowledge. It just takes a few weeks to adjust from Windows, just as if from Mac to Windows.

    I have never had the problems that you have had with Linux, but I can see where you are coming from. Linux users in forums can help you if you have problems, and if they can't, documentation is becoming available.

    Recommendation:

    Let us just say that Linux is an OS which gives you control of your computer, whereas Windows limits you more, which, with some users, protects their computer. If you are an aspiring programmer, then Linux is for you. Please be aware, however, that while some major companies may not support it, there are many programs that you can download for FREE, that have the same function as Windows programs.

    Desktop usage of Linux is definately becoming a serious consideration.

    Do you agree KenLynch?

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    63
    Do you agree KenLynch?
    Not entirely.

    Let us just say that Linux is an OS which gives you control of your computer, whereas Windows limits you more, which, with some users, protects their computer.
    I don't find that Windows has limited me in any way, I can get my work done quickly and efficiently because I have the tools I need. While it would be true if 3DFA was produced for Linux then one more tool would be available on Linux, I would still have lots of other tools that keep me using Windows. Most of those tools are all available on OSX, the only thing keeping me moving to Apple is having to buy all my software and hardware again!

    Don't get me wrong, I am saddened by the state of Linux, I had great hopes for it, but any time I made suggestions about ease of use and standardisation I was shouted down and told to code it myself if I wanted it. Well, not everyone has the coding skill to do that do they? Surely if Linux is a community project the programmers need to know that input from users, even non-programmers, is valuable input.

    Granted: Linux requires a more in depth knowledge of computers to use it to its full potential, but you can use it with minimal knowledge. It just takes a few weeks to adjust from Windows, just as if from Mac to Windows.
    My issues have never been with the desktop interface, they have always been with hardware installation and configuration. With Windows and OSX you can simply plug in a USB device and install the driver from CD or the web and you're away - Linux is not there yet, so mass adoption of Linux as a desktop solution is still a long way off in my opinion.

    Linux users in forums can help you if you have problems, and if they can't, documentation is becoming available.
    The problem I've had with forums is the wide variety of responses from helpful to downright rude. I know this isn't a Linux problem, but it can be off-putting. Also, because of the distro/kernel specific nature of certain things it is hard to sift out the relevant information and the trouble is that there is sometimes too much information and there is a lot of old information. Also, when in Windows or OSX have you ever had to go to the command line to install? I haven't touched the command line in Windows for a long time but I still see posts on forums saying "all you have to do is type 'apt-get install package-foo'" as if that is the most obvious thing. It's not obvious.

    With Winodows my wife can install software and hardware quite happily, I know she'd be lost with Linux.

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Australia
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    That is true...

    kenlynch--
    I can see where you are coming from, but I personally have never had those problems.

    I guess the reason you were shouted down was because it would take much work to make Linux much easier to use. GNOME and KDE are brilliant, and require little work in conjunction with rpm installs.

    I have needed nothing that Linux hasn't provided (apart from 3DFA), because it is generally complete.

    I still recommend linux for those who are willing to try it.

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