dcsimg
A Flash Developer Resource Site

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Designing Posters vs Web Design?

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    459

    Designing Posters vs Web Design?

    Hello,

    I want to design posters. An Art Director I worked for told me that the principles behind flash design, versus print design differ. In Flash, you have to think how everything harmonizes together in a small way. Whereas, in posters, you have to think big! Everything has to stand out; the photo, the graphic, the font!

    Does anyone have any suggestions, book, or tutorials for designing posters?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    He has risen! lefteyewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    2,597
    While the basic design principles can be similar to posters and web design, you're looking at a completely different beast in the creation/setup aspect of them. If you're not used to print design, i suggest you really consult with any other designers you ahve in your roledex.

    When you're going for print design, remember EVERY image that you place has to be at least set at 300dpi. Text should not be (unless it's good quality) consist of free fonts you found on the web. Pay close attention to 'bleeds' if they are required, other wise you'll have a border around your image or you'll have things cut off of your poster. Before you completely setup you files, you should have an idea of who's going to print the posters. Make sure you talk to a knowledgable person at the print shop which will be able to point you in the right direction of paper weights, gloss/flat, and color pallettes (CMYK matching).

    Those are just a few of the specs that you'll need for the creation. THe design is up to you and your client.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    While the basic design principles can be similar to posters and web design, you're looking at a completely different beast in the creation/setup aspect of them. If you're not used to print design, i suggest you really consult with any other designers you ahve in your roledex.

    When you're going for print design, remember EVERY image that you place has to be at least set at 300dpi. Text should not be (unless it's good quality) consist of free fonts you found on the web. Pay close attention to 'bleeds' if they are required, other wise you'll have a border around your image or you'll have things cut off of your poster. Before you completely setup you files, you should have an idea of who's going to print the posters. Make sure you talk to a knowledgable person at the print shop which will be able to point you in the right direction of paper weights, gloss/flat, and color pallettes (CMYK matching).

    Those are just a few of the specs that you'll need for the creation. THe design is up to you and your client.
    Thanks for the feedback.
    Shouldn't I also make sure the printer has the fonts I am using? Of course... if not, I should put them in a folder for him/her.

    Another question: I have to work in the same page size ratio as the poster size I'm designing for, correct? I mean, there is no blowing the image, right?

    I know, I know, I'm mentally young for my age.

  4. #4
    He has risen! lefteyewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    2,597
    Quote Originally Posted by An Artist
    Thanks for the feedback.
    Shouldn't I also make sure the printer has the fonts I am using? Of course... if not, I should put them in a folder for him/her.

    Another question: I have to work in the same page size ratio as the poster size I'm designing for, correct? I mean, there is no blowing the image, right?

    I know, I know, I'm mentally young for my age.
    Well, it depends on what type of file you're sending to print and what the printer requires. One may require PDF, some may want the Raw working files. With a poster, i'd assume you can send a PDF which will have the fonts embedded in it (if you flatten it first in photoshop). This is different then say a magazine or multi page brochure. Many times just to be sure, i'll burn a CD wiht both the PDF as well as the working file along with any fonts that i've used.

    Page ratio: Of course you have to keep the same orientation. Blowing up images to size aren't a very good idea. Remember that what you see on your screen is NOT what you're going to get when it goes to print. And i hope i'm not insulting you here, but DO NOT use .gifs in print design. Even JPGs sometimes are a bit frowned upon. TIFF's are the usual. And again, more than likely you'll be printing in CMYK color. Make sure that you have all of your images set in CMYK mode before you move it over to your working files or you may get unexpected color shifts.

    Back to what maxwell said, everything depends on the paper, the printer process, the ink, etc., etc.

    ON a side note about fonts. Don't ever assume that the person you're sending your file to has the same fonts as you.


    EDIT: About blowing up images. There's a certain percentage that you can blow up an image before it gets pixilated at 300 DPI. I'm not quite sure what htat is, but don't ever double the size of the image you're placing. When you pull the image into your working space, the size that it looks like in the working space is the actual size of the image.
    Last edited by lefteyewilly; 12-08-2005 at 08:12 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    When you pull the image into your working space, the size that it looks like in the working space is the actual size of the image.
    Thanks for the excellent information.
    Can you please exmplain the above quote again?

  6. #6
    And loving it!
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    26
    Then there is typography... spacing... kerning... scale... making sure colours are right and CMYK percentages add up... worrying about overprinting... finishes.... paper type.... ink type.... printing method.... I think from a design perspective a good poster is far more difficult to design than a good website.
    "Give a man an inch, and right away he thinks he's a ruler."

  7. #7
    He has risen! lefteyewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    2,597
    Quote Originally Posted by maxwell smart
    Then there is typography... spacing... kerning... scale... making sure colours are right and CMYK percentages add up... worrying about overprinting... finishes.... paper type.... ink type.... printing method.... I think from a design perspective a good poster is far more difficult to design than a good website.
    You are 100% correct on that. The only difference is that it takes a long time to learn code for a webpage (which some people, like myself) don't have the mindset for. Learning how to use a program is time consuming, but not as hard.

    Personally, i've been lucky in that I was allowed to experiment at my job with various print jobs. They'd let me design it, and basically i just had to learn from my mistakes as far as all the aboved mentioned things that need attention. With my mistakes, it gave me a lot of experience...enough to start doing my own freelance. Yeah i still worry that i might screw it up, but i can make a lot more money based on time designing print over web.

  8. #8
    And loving it!
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    You are 100% correct on that. The only difference is that it takes a long time to learn code for a webpage (which some people, like myself) don't have the mindset for. Learning how to use a program is time consuming, but not as hard.
    The difference is you can correct a website once its gone live. It's a very costly and time consuming correction for even the smallest error in print once its printed...
    "Give a man an inch, and right away he thinks he's a ruler."

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by maxwell smart
    Then there is typography... spacing... kerning... scale... making sure colours are right and CMYK percentages add up... worrying about overprinting... finishes.... paper type.... ink type.... printing method.... I think from a design perspective a good poster is far more difficult to design than a good website.
    What do you mean by "over printing?"

    Shouldn't I get some pantone swatches for myself before I start design for prints?

  10. #10
    And loving it!
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by An Artist
    What do you mean by "over printing?"

    Shouldn't I get some pantone swatches for myself before I start design for prints?
    Means printing a colour over another colour, instead of against the white paper.

    Its often used to enhance colours by making them stronger or in situations such as if you are printing black text on a coloured background and you don't want any white ghosting to show up between the text and your background since printing is done one colour at a time and there can (depending on the quality of the printers) be slippage in alignment between colours.

    Also of note is that the black you see in photoshop when designing for the web is not black. Especially if you have a large area of it. A single pass of black (c0 m0 y0 k100) is not very black, so often they will print it again to get a darker black or use what is called Rich Black, a combination of black and a blend of the other colours to get a "blacker than black" black.

    As for pantone swatches, yes you need them if you are serious about print but they are very costly and there are different types depending on what type of paper you are printing on, what inks you are using or what printing process you are using...
    Last edited by maxwell smart; 12-08-2005 at 09:33 PM.
    "Give a man an inch, and right away he thinks he's a ruler."

  11. #11
    associate admedia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    is
    Posts
    1,347
    Just to add something... when you are going large (poster size), it doesn't always have to be 300dpi. I know 300dpi is the mantra for print design, usually full page magazine stuff though... bigger stuff you can get away with less.

    I just got off the phone with a graphics house who is going to produce a 43 x 30 inch duratrans for me, they told be anything above 200 dpi is a waste.

    I have done large-scale pieces at 150 that look fine too...

    Just saying 300 dpi becomes less of an issue the bigger you go.

  12. #12
    He has risen! lefteyewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    2,597
    Quote Originally Posted by admedia
    Just to add something... when you are going large (poster size), it doesn't always have to be 300dpi. I know 300dpi is the mantra for print design, usually full page magazine stuff though... bigger stuff you can get away with less.

    I just got off the phone with a graphics house who is going to produce a 43 x 30 inch duratrans for me, they told be anything above 200 dpi is a waste.

    I have done large-scale pieces at 150 that look fine too...

    Just saying 300 dpi becomes less of an issue the bigger you go.
    Thanks Admedia, that's a tip i'll have to try sometime.

    Oh, and in case there's some newbies here, never take an image that's 72dpi and try to convert it to 300dpi without changing it's size properties. Most digital cameras at it's highest resolution will take a photo that is 72dpi, but is 36 x 27 inches. You'll have to divide both of these numbers by 4.17 to keep the same pixel ratio when changing dpi to 300. (and of course you'll ahve to do your own math if your converting to 150 or 200)

  13. #13
    He has risen! lefteyewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    2,597
    just ignore it. It had reasoning behind it, but i completely worded it wrong. Just don't double or triple the size of an image after you pull it into your working file.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




Click Here to Expand Forum to Full Width

HTML5 Development Center