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Thread: NEXT creative frontier

  1. #1
    Sun Devil asun2art's Avatar
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    NEXT creative frontier

    This was just too good. Had to share.

    THE NEXT CREATIVE FRONTIER
    Warren Tomlin
    Chief Creative Officer
    Fuel Industries


    The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write; they will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. --- Alvin Toffler

    Only advertising people with their heads firmly planted in the sand donít realize that the traditional advertising model is broken, and itís only a matter of time before the dams break and the industry has to start bailing for its life. Online advertising represents only a fraction of current media spending, but it is increasing every day as clients realize that passive advertising effectiveness is in decline. If the advertising industry is going to evolve, itís the creative class who have to take action.

    A successful ad is dependent on the number of people who see it and register it. When there were three major networks, a few major daily newspapers and a handful of mainstream magazines, this was much easier to accomplish. The dawn of specialty cable channels changed our reality slightly, with the higher channels competing for the niche crumbs. People didnít like ads, but they put up with them because of the unwritten contract that the content was brought to you by the advertiser.

    This model of media depends on scarcity in order for it to be valuable. The more scarce the media, the more valuable it is to the advertisers (market share) and the more valuable the content is to the viewer (restricted choice). But in a world where digital cable and broadband internet provides a billion channel universe to the average user, media scarcity no longer exists. People can now consume information and entertainment on their own terms, which often means free of advertising.

    We can rail against this trend, and stomp our feet and say itís not fair. We can threaten legal action and announce that if they donít watch our commercials, that televisions shows will go away. Either way, weíre waging an unwinnable war. The power of media is now in the hands of the consumers, and itís up to us to reinvent our business with these new rules in mind and create advertising that people want to consume.

    Iím not about to suggest that all advertising will, or even should, move online. However, we can use the web to understand how people want to be engaged, rather than attempting to dictate how we will speak to our audience. The future of media consumption is interactive and on-demand. PVR and media centre use is poised to skyrocket in the coming years. Interactive display advertising technology is almost ready for primetime, but we have barely scratched the surface of the communications possibilities that these new technologies provide.

    The people who will enable this revolution are the Creatives. The strategists of the world can see the trends and can even try to predict what and how needs to be changed, but the re-imagining of interactive content is in the hands of the artists, designers and interaction designers. Sadly, this reimagining is often stifled by a fear of change from those who refuse to believe that the tidal wave at our shores, and who will remain complacent until the revenues start to erode significantly. At that point, weíll already be underwater.

    Author Theodore Hook said ďthe best way to predict the future is to invent it.Ē The realization that our world is changing so quickly that itís in danger of leaving us behind should be a rallying call to our entire profession to focus all of our energy on rethinking the model and how we look at media. It should be a welcome invitation to put our titles to the test and use the creativity that weíre so fond of touting to shape the future. Now is the time for the creatives to change the world.
    For some, this is a tumultuous time to work in advertising. For the creatives who are willing to leave the past behind and reinvent, there has never been a more exciting time to work in this industry. The visionaries will help shape the future of how brands connect with people. The rest will be left to explain why their ads are no longer moving products.

    While the creatives will drive the possibilities, senior managers need to wrap their heads around the business models, sustainability and possibilities. If your CEO is afraid of change, your companyís structure so rigid or your agency so hopelessly addicted to a television based revenue model, then realize you may be standing on the last deck of the Titanic. The drinks are still flowing and the band is playing but the iceberg is straight ahead.

    The good news is that the revolution will be led by the creative class. The next generation of CEOs and corporate leaders will be chosen for their ability to think creatively, their ability to adapt and reinvent, and not for incrementally feeding the status quo.

    You are the vanguard. Change is not something that happens - itís something you have to create. Frankly, itís always much more fun being part of the revolution than watching from the sidelines. If you believe in the cause and can make the shift, raise your weapons and join the revolution. It may be messy, but it certainly wonít be boring.

  2. #2
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    Very nice read. Completely agree with that quote

  3. #3
    Always Twirling Toward Freedom pooon's Avatar
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    I just hope we don't end up in some Minority Report type advertising world where the billboards call you out by name. Thats where I draw the line.

  4. #4
    Juvenile Delinquent CVO Chris's Avatar
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    Ads are created.

    People are bombarded with ads.

    People become immune to ads.

    New types of ads are created.

    People are bombarded with new types of ads.

    People become immune to new types of ads.

    The advertiser's tactics and consumer's resistance is almost like a never ending armsrace. pooon I believe something similar to what you mention will eventually become the norm. We are also subjected to subliminal adverts that target us on the subconscious level already. We're all brainwashed to a certain extent.
    Last edited by CVO Chris; 03-21-2008 at 05:54 PM.

  5. #5
    Hood Rich FlashLackey's Avatar
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    Very true CVO.

    The article was very insightful I believe. But, it was from an advertisers perspective. Frankly, I'm glad that new technology and increased user sophistication is driving ads away. We don't need ads as much as advertisers want our money because we know better what we want and where to find it. New technology, namely increased interactivity, is changing the supply and demand arrangement for advertisement in general.

    Down with ads. Up with value.
    "We don't estimate speeches." - CBO Director Doug Elmendorf

  6. #6
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    Wouldn't subliminal advertising be banned?

    There was a case in Australia late last/early this year when YouTube uploads of this televisions show (it was some sort of television awards night) revealed brand logos being flashed. The network defended it as "creative rapid cutting".

    http://business.smh.com.au/ten-inves...0220-1tfe.html

    Apparently another event occurred but was put down as a "technical glitch".

  7. #7
    He has risen! lefteyewilly's Avatar
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    the argument made here is quite like the one of why can't we just ditch oil as a country/society/world. It's a never ending cycle of why, who, how, and most importantly $$$.

    Frankly, I'm glad that new technology and increased user sophistication is driving ads away
    haha!!!!!! that is now the most naive statement i think you've ever made. I'm not flaming here, i'm really not...it's just ludicrous that you think that technology has decreased advertising.

    Your view on advertising is quite micro in scope. I think what most people who hate ads don't realize that the ads that every one of thos ads that you are in the market for effect your decision....of course tampon commercials and denture cream aren't going to effect you, their a waste of your time.

    Are you sitting in front of a computer right now? (of course)...do you happen to have a TV on at the same time? How about a radio? How many web pages do you have open in your browser right now? How many ads are you seeing? And don't tell me Adblock is doing anythng....90% of computer users don't know about adblock....

    Technology has done nothing but shift marketers to reach out to this generation in new ways. Why do you think Myspace, youtube, facebook, and a 100 other sites have garnished huge bids from huge companies? The exposure value is there.

    How's your local newspaper doing? How's their online business?

    Like CVO said, consumers get bored with one thing and move to another.

    And i'm only going to touch on product placement in TV shows, movies, sports games....it's endless.

    With that said, my point being is that advertising is never going to go away, no matter what we do about. The paradigm on what's being advertised to who has changed dramatically....just to keep my argument short here (because we all know people don't read too much....data provided by market research )....geotargeting, search targeting, demographic targeting (think about above websites). They've all increased revenue for companies.

    Marketers are only as smart as consumers...that's the god's honest truth. Otherwise we'd all be farmers being self sufficient.
    Last edited by lefteyewilly; 03-22-2008 at 12:30 AM.

  8. #8
    Hood Rich FlashLackey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    haha!!!!!! that is now the most naive statement i think you've ever made. I'm not flaming here, i'm really not...it's just ludicrous that you think that technology has decreased advertising.
    What I think about this is not only naive but the most naive thing I've said? In other words, you believe I say naive things frequently. It's also ludicrous. Yet, that isn't a flame?

    Wow. Uncharacteristically offensive coming from you. You don't need to resort to put downs to disagree with someone. Doesn't really further your argument either.

    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    Your view on advertising is quite micro in scope. I think what most people who hate ads don't realize that the ads that every one of thos ads that you are in the market for effect your decision....of course tampon commercials and denture cream aren't going to effect you, their a waste of your time.
    I've been working directly with many of the major sources of ads, helping to build them, for several years now. I dare say that I know a thing or two about it.

    My point, the same one the article and CVO made, is that the nature of technology on the internet gives more power to choose and interact to the consumer. Consumers can learn where to go on their own, learn to avoid ad-covered sites, learn to avoid new ad schemes. In my view, far too much expense goes into advertising. That damages the value of products. The trend that the article discusses means that advertisers are being forced by nature of the technology to consider new ways to entice consumers their way. For instance, instead of a plain banner commercial, companies are finding that more sophisticated ads that add some value for the consumer are more effective. For example, a game about an upcoming movie. If the game is enjoyable on it's own merit, the content is far more likely to be digested.

    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    Are you sitting in front of a computer right now? (of course)...do you happen to have a TV on at the same time? How about a radio? How many web pages do you have open in your browser right now? How many ads are you seeing? And don't tell me Adblock is doing anythng....90% of computer users don't know about adblock....
    Did you think I was saying that ads are disappearing completely or that I don't see ads? It doesn't seem like you really thought this through before taking aim at me.

    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    Technology has done nothing but shift marketers to reach out to this generation in new ways. Why do you think Myspace, youtube, facebook, and a 100 other sites have garnished huge bids from huge companies? The exposure value is there.
    The point of the article was that the effectiveness of previous means was diminishing. I say good.

    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    Like CVO said, consumers get bored with one thing and move to another.
    I agreed with CVO. Consumers don't get bored, they get smart. The choice that new technology offers has led to a more rapid rate of consumers wising up to the latest ad schemes. The guy in the article, as an advertiser, is basically giving a pep talk to the industry to think of new ways to advertize. I read that as creating experiences that are more valuable to the consumer.

    Quote Originally Posted by lefteyewilly
    With that said, my point being is that advertising is never going to go away, no matter what we do about. The paradigm on what's being advertised to who has changed dramatically....just to keep my argument short here (because we all know people don't read too much....data provided by market research )....geotargeting, search targeting, demographic targeting (think about above websites). They've all increased revenue for companies.
    Increasingly, it appears, traditional means of advertising are becoming less effective. I think that is a good thing. It's an evolution of sorts. Of course we won't be rid of advertizing completely. However, I think it would benefit us if it were toned down to a sane volume.
    "We don't estimate speeches." - CBO Director Doug Elmendorf

  9. #9
    Juvenile Delinquent CVO Chris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlashLackey
    The guy in the article, as an advertiser, is basically giving a pep talk to the industry to think of new ways to advertize. I read that as creating experiences that are more valuable to the consumer.
    This is the future of advertising online. As mentioned above there is an increased amount of games coming out for new DVD's etc. I remember a flash family guy streetfighter game that was released online prior to series 6 being released on DVD. To use this as an example I came across it though a link either on a forum or email. Suddenley the game/ad becomes viral. It's on newgrounds or people send the link to the game to other people while bored at work etc. As the article mentions, it's the creatives who are in the driving seat. This kind of interaction beats banner ads hands down and there is also no "per click" cost as there is for banner ads as the game is usually on the company's own website.

    Quote Originally Posted by Saint Benedetta
    Wouldn't subliminal advertising be banned?

    There was a case in Australia late last/early this year when YouTube uploads of this televisions show (it was some sort of television awards night) revealed brand logos being flashed. The network defended it as "creative rapid cutting".

    http://business.smh.com.au/ten-inves...0220-1tfe.html

    Apparently another event occurred but was put down as a "technical glitch".
    I wasn't referring to that sort of covert advertising but overt subliminal advertising. Product placement for example. When watching a show we may not notice the product being displayed or even used but our subconscious mind is in fact taking note. It works well and advertisers know this. We're assaulted on all fronts and now I hear about a new strategy of word of mouth advertising where people receive stuff from companys in return of mentioning the products in conversation with friends or family. There seems to be no let up.
    Last edited by CVO Chris; 03-22-2008 at 10:32 AM.

  10. #10
    Hood Rich FlashLackey's Avatar
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    Indeed. I think they're also finding that their ad budgets are more effectively spent making their product pages better than on plastering the net with graphics. A quality design and experience can create as much of a buzz as anything. There are also companies like http://www.designmyroom.com/ that are using spaces that were traditionally one page ads and creating applications that are both useful tools and ways of moving traffic their way.
    "We don't estimate speeches." - CBO Director Doug Elmendorf

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