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lesli_felix
03-24-2002, 12:54 PM
I mean what kind of wizardy is everybody here capable of in maths?

Calculus is about my limit.

wyl_m
03-25-2002, 12:51 AM
calculus along with a bit of discrete structures

bit-101
03-28-2002, 05:46 PM
basic trig.

but i might be using some calculus without knowing it! :)

minger
03-28-2002, 05:49 PM
Undergrad Engineer, so I have had tons of math classes and a few physics.

lesli_felix
03-28-2002, 06:36 PM
Cool.
I used to be a bit of prodigy when I was a kid. Solved pick's theorem in 5 minutes when I was twelve year's old. I flunked out though when I discovered girls and beer. I don't even know what discrete structures are...

Still, having enjoyed my youth to the max, time to start learning again.....

Ed Mack
03-30-2002, 05:47 PM
I havn't even done KS3 maths yet.. it's simple anyway, the top tier includes some *gosh* simple trig.

Ian424
04-07-2002, 12:18 PM
i'm still in geometry. ack :p

volf2000
04-08-2002, 03:18 PM
trig... and some calculus.... but i got college ahead of me....so who knows wat wizardy they'll teach me there? :)
ales V.

john_bws
04-15-2002, 12:22 AM
these were the classes I took in connecticut when working on my BS in mathematics

Discrete Mathematics
Calculus
Combinatorics
Linear Algebra
Theory of Probability
Vector Analysis
Transformations and Geometries
Ordinary Differential Equations
Theory of Numbers
Abstract Algebra
Chaos and Dynamical Systems
Advanced Calculus I
Partial Differential Equations
Algebra I
Algebra II
Advanced Calculus II
Functions of a Complex Variable
Topology
Differential Geometry
Real Variables
Algebra
Topology
Number Theory
Complex Variables

the latter five were graduate classes that were to go towards a MA/PhD but who knew it was so hard to make money for a mathematician? those classes are a total bastardized/americanized version of a proper mathematics education. advanced calculus was nothing more than analysis algebra covered nearly everything (representation theory, group theory, galois theory). the best classes are what you get to later topology, diff. geo., and complex vars. although they dont help you anywhere because now i teach intermediate math and make flash animations to show them concepts

enemem
04-15-2002, 01:45 PM
Originally posted by bit-101
basic trig.


lol. being a little modest there I think, bit :)

just so it's not completely off topic: I studied maths at university but I hated all applied maths, just concentrated on the theoretical (algebra mostly: group theory, lattice theory, rings & fields if anyone is really that interested).

so when it comes to things like mechanics, geometry et al. it's not too easy anymore. (+ I've forgotten most of what I learnt anyway - if you don't use it for a while it just kinda disappears).

- n.

bit-101
04-15-2002, 03:06 PM
lol. being a little modest there I think, bit :)


not really. i did high school algebra and geometry. i think we might have gone into some basic trig there. that was many years ago. i picked up the rest on my own. i really don't know anything very advanced. i just learn one concept and exploit the hell out of it, learn another one, exploit that, then combine them and do all i can with those two, learn another one, etc.
i'd say it's 40% knowing the math, 60% figuring out cool things to do with it that make it look like you know 10x as much as you really do! :D

john_bws
04-15-2002, 03:38 PM
enemem,
that is very interesting. are you from the uk (beceause of your use of "maths")? i spent a summer at oxford with a professor from the us and found it far too advanced for me. i must have been the stupidest person within 100km. i agree, pure mathemtics has always been more intersting to me

enemem
04-16-2002, 04:15 AM
Originally posted by john_bws
enemem,
that is very interesting. are you from the uk (beceause of your use of "maths")? i spent a summer at oxford with a professor from the us and found it far too advanced for me. i must have been the stupidest person within 100km. i agree, pure mathemtics has always been more intersting to me

gave myself away - have to be more careful :D hmmm - guess where I went to university? :D I have to agree that going from school maths to uni maths was an incredible shock. what used to be relatively easy sometimes became almost impossible - I can really emphasise with people who don't have the knack for maths at school now! also makes you very humble to be surrounded by so many v. intelligent people.

when did you come to oxford? I stayed into the summer once and met some American summer students - would be really funny if we had met there! :)

(actually - maybe shouldn't discuss this here but we could see how long they let us - just mention 'mathematics' from time to time :D)

- n.

john_bws
04-16-2002, 09:22 PM
MATH . that should buy some time.

i was there during the summer of 1995. i used to live in india, then my advisor moved to connecticut and so did i. then that same professor then took a visit to cambridge to collabrote with a prof. on modular forms and elliptic curves. not too long after taniyama-shimura conjecture had been explored throughly. it was very interesting, although mostly beyond me.

enemem
04-17-2002, 04:49 AM
Originally posted by john_bws
on modular forms and elliptic curves. not too long after taniyama-shimura conjecture had been explored throughly. it was very interesting, although mostly beyond me.

I'm glad you said that - because I have no idea what you are talking about :D I think the summer I stayed longer was 96 - so no luck - sorry :)

just wondering: are there any physicists around at all?

- n.

Jamez Brown
04-27-2002, 09:26 PM
3+7=10 that about all i know! :D

sazeMaster
05-17-2002, 10:31 AM
I HATE MATHEMATIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :mad:

Ed Mack
05-18-2002, 08:49 AM
Is that all you have to say? Thanks. Is your keyboard broken, because that last sentence was all in caps (you better get it fixed, some people might mistake you as lame). And also, it's very poor english to use that many !'s and use mathematic as a noun. I'm sure everyone would be a lot happier if you contributed somthing slightly more refined to the conversation.

What exactly does calculus cover? I'm guessing the basics pah. My guesses hehe

I also like math a lot, and will most likely will take it further. Which courses are more interesting, and cover ground?

ahab
05-18-2002, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by Ed Mack
What exactly does calculus cover? I'm guessing the basics pah. My guesses hehe
Calculus covers quite a bit; it is not as scary as many people would like it to be though. Calculus address two fundamental questions: what is the slope of a curve at a point, and what is the area under a curve. The solution to both these problems make up a small part of calculus ... it is mainly the application to other problems and fields that make calculus so vast.


Originally posted by Ed Mack
I also like math a lot, and will most likely will take it further. Which courses are more interesting, and cover ground?
There are two types of mathematics: pure mathematics, and applied mathematics. Pure mathematics has proven to be the most interesting to me, but is the hardest for people to get into with no experience. It is entirely dependent on rigor and proofs. Subjects of pure mathematics are modern algebra, graph theory, combinatorics, number theory, topology, and other subjects.

Applied mathematics is what most people like to study. I personally do not like studying these subjects because the problems are not as challenging and insightful. Subjects include trigonometry, calculus, differential equations, and more. Don't get me wrong ... most of the applied subjects are absolute necessities before you can understand pure mathematics, but the latter is far more worth your time as a hobby.

My personal favorite subjects: combinatorics, real analysis, and algebra.

Good luck.

KeyserSoze
05-19-2002, 11:53 PM
Originally posted by sazeMaster
I HATE MATHEMATIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :mad:

Also not too fond of english.

enemem
05-21-2002, 04:37 AM
Originally posted by Ed Mack
I also like math a lot, and will most likely will take it further. Which courses are more interesting, and cover ground?

ahab made it sound a little bit (perhaps unintentionally?) like applied mathematics is a stepping stone on the way to understanding pure maths. I would rather say that pure maths involves the study of mathematical structures themselves, whereas applied maths uses mathematics to study real-world phenomena (although they might not always seem like 'real-world' :)), so they are two different areas.

The off-shoot of this is that applied maths is often more accessible to some people since it involves other subject areas and might touch upon another field of interest - for example biology, physics, chemistry, gambling, strategics/logistics, finance, even music, you name it - there will be some maths behind it.

If you are still at school/college or whatever, take a range of courses - that's the only way to discover what you like. It's also useful to get at least a little grounding in all areas of maths if you are semi-serious about studying it. If it's more of a hobby and you're not studying anymore, I would just read around, take a current area of interest and see what maths there is behind it.

Also newish areas like chaos theory, game theory and the likes are well worth a look IMHO. They are fascinating without knowing huge amounts of background information. In comparison, if you study something like group theory (part of algebra) for example, it will take years and years to learn the fundamental parts, which can be a bit frustrating.

phew. could talk about this for hours but better do some work now :)

- n.

ahab
05-21-2002, 12:16 PM
Actually, I thought I was trying to convey the opposite, but I wrote it in a hurry. I see the sentence that made you think that ... I was mainly saying that calculus and differential equations are always taught with applications, even though they are used very much in pure mathematics.

I think the best subject for a beginner is number theory because you hardly need to know anything about math. In fact, the best math book I own (out of over 70 books) is a little 200 page book called "Friendly Introduction to Number Theory" by Joseph Silverman that I bought a few years ago. There isn't a single other math branch mentioned in the book except for number theory and I couldn't put it down.

Tamponio
05-25-2002, 07:06 AM
1+1=3 right ?

Jamez Brown
05-26-2002, 12:30 AM
7+3+10 :D

Jamez Brown
05-26-2002, 12:31 AM
7+3=10 :D

obelisk29
05-26-2002, 12:39 AM
basic trig and some calculus

brutfood
06-05-2002, 09:41 PM
Peanos axioms :)

mikaelian
06-06-2002, 04:53 PM
I am very much glad to see this active discussion around mathematics.

I am a PhD in maths (algebra, group theory). I have many publications and I have written a part of the following book published by the American Mathematical Society:
http://www.ams.org/bookstore?co1=AND&co2=AND&co3=AND&d=BOOK&f=G&fn=105&l=100&op1=ADJ&op2=ADJ&op3=ADJ&p=1&pg1=&pg2=&pg3=ALLF&r=1&s1=&s2=&s3=%22Varieties%20of%20groups%22&subject=genint&u=

etc...

enemem
06-06-2002, 06:44 PM
Originally posted by mikaelian
I am very much glad to see this active discussion around mathematics.

I am a PhD in maths (algebra, group theory). I have many publications and I have written a part of the following book published by the American Mathematical Society:
http://www.ams.org/bookstore?co1=AND&co2=AND&co3=AND&d=BOOK&f=G&fn=105&l=100&op1=ADJ&op2=ADJ&op3=ADJ&p=1&pg1=&pg2=&pg3=ALLF&r=1&s1=&s2=&s3=%22Varieties%20of%20groups%22&subject=genint&u=

etc...

mikaelian - what are you working as now? is it still maths related? was just wondering...

- n.

Ed Mack
06-07-2002, 04:35 PM
I'm in Year 10, so courses are quite far ahead of me, along with any other studies. One area that sounds quite interesting is topology. Also, physics is somthing else I like and will take on.

Smilev
06-07-2002, 05:13 PM
Hmm ... in uni I had 6 parts of Mathematics-- Linear Algebra and Analytic Geometry 2 parts, Mathematical Analisys 2 parts , Theory of posibility and Spherical Trigonometry... I always hated the theory though LOL I mean I dont know the names of the theoremes etc but I loved to solve mathematical problems ... I forgot much of it anyway LOL I'm not sure I can solve a differential or an integral equation right now :D

swills
06-09-2002, 07:26 AM
Enemem

You asked for physicists to make themselves known - are we going to take over the world now? Is this the call to arms!

swills