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phil-ray
02-22-2006, 08:17 AM
hi guys need a little help here.

for my newst tech project i have went back to taking photos by film as i want to produce s series of big prints to be wall mounted and my little 4mpixel z2 doesnt do the job

any way my camera is an old minolta X-700 (yes its a few years old) i have took a film of cars in a car park and at verious shows at night, u know cruseing and boy racers and all that stuff. (must get some of the pics scanned in to show you's, some have tunred out pretty well) i have3 been useing a tripod and a remote controle thing so not to shake the camera. with exposures all around a minute or so but alot of the pics are a bit graney for my liking.

So whats the best film for taking pics at night?

at the moment i have just been useing a standered 200 iso Canon film bought from boots or another chemest.

frex
02-22-2006, 10:45 AM
I recommend Konica Color CENTURIA SUPER 800...or any other high sensitive film :)

robbmcaulay
02-22-2006, 11:04 AM
I see where you're coming from Frex but he can afford to have a long shutter speed so a slow film like Velvia 50 (http://www.fujifilm.com/JSP/fuji/epartners/proPhotoProductVelvia.jsp;jsessionid=F1A454787DC8C 35767282DD5B25424B5) would reduce grain and i've heard it have pretty nice colour too!

phil-ray
02-22-2006, 12:04 PM
so a 50 iso would be best for long night time shots?


ill look into that film and see if any locol camer places has them

ToddSm66
02-22-2006, 12:25 PM
If you use Velvia, you will probably need to pick up some magenta color compensating filters as well, as Velvia will shift to green during long exposures.

robbmcaulay
02-22-2006, 12:33 PM
so a 50 iso would be best for long night time shots?

Yes, using a low ISO requires the shutter to be open longer, but it will reduce the grain :thumbsup:

gesteves
02-22-2006, 12:37 PM
Check this tutorial (http://www.danheller.com/star-trails.html).

carly1979
02-22-2006, 01:54 PM
(must get some of the pics scanned in to show you's, some have tunred out pretty well)i'd definitely be interested in seeing them :)

phil-ray
02-22-2006, 07:36 PM
i'd definitely be interested in seeing them :)

ikll get them on line when i get into uni on monday. havnet a scanner in the house, must have to invest in one for the house

Big Up Ya
02-24-2006, 10:05 AM
Don't forget to compensate for reciprocity with long exposures, you will otherwise underexpose the film. The amount varies depending on the film, the details usually can be found on the inside of the box or tech sheets. Anything over 10 seconds with something like Velvia you will need to give it some more exposure. It can be as little as 1 second for neg films. As someone said above most films shift colour with long exposures so be sure to check related tech info or tweak in photoshop later.

phil-ray
02-24-2006, 07:30 PM
Don't forget to compensate for reciprocity with long exposures, you will otherwise underexpose the film. The amount varies depending on the film, the details usually can be found on the inside of the box or tech sheets. Anything over 10 seconds with something like Velvia you will need to give it some more exposure. It can be as little as 1 second for neg films. As someone said above most films shift colour with long exposures so be sure to check related tech info or tweak in photoshop later.

thaks for the tip, ill make sure to kook at the info on the film box/ sheet.

normaly just stick the film in and hope as im sure most people do