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Steven-SSD
01-24-2001, 04:05 AM
What's the likely price to charge on a standard flash sites..lets say it consist of intro - site? or maybe just the site itself..

I understand that prices may vary on the amount of work and content of the client.. but whats the range basically charged by you guys..

Hey thanks in advanced..

franklin001
01-24-2001, 04:28 AM
Good question , i wanna know 2 (prices in euro's plz);)

chewman2k
01-24-2001, 04:40 AM
You'll get more replies there.

oh and btw, the price just depends on what you are charging them for...if you're doing their whole website for them...then obviously its going to be a considerable amount, but if you're just doing an intro for the site, then it shouldn't be that much.

hope that helps, but yeah, I don't believe that there's any 'standard' price.

artbones
01-24-2001, 03:37 PM
Everyone always asks this...It is actually pretty simple to price things. Just estimate how long it will take you to complete, and add about 1/3 longer. Now, determine what you are worth hourly. Multiply the hours it will take you to complete the project by your hourly. That will give you a rough estimate to negotiate with. Just don't sell yourself short, or you'll be sorry...and hate the product and the client.

mgb
01-24-2001, 07:20 PM
...but I guess it comes down to how much to charge per hour?????

~ mgb

Steven-SSD
01-24-2001, 07:47 PM
Aight ok.. I thought the longe is where I can post this question...so my bad hehe..

All you guys said is just basically charged by the hour...But a couple of companies that I know would actually prefer to be charged by a single amount.. not by the hours.

thats why i asked about the standard range lol

- yes Chewman am talking about whole website work..

Virtuoso
01-25-2001, 03:47 AM
The first thing you need to do in business is to set out a business and marketing plan. You need to work out how much your outgoings and running costs are and take into consideration ALL the factors. From this you can work out how much you need to earn in order to make a PROFIT. You also need to know how long work takes you and what you are capable of (then add some more time!). Get everything in writing and have a watertight contract that covers you is also important.
IF you really want to succeed you will invest in a good business plan, do some research and get some professional assistance.
People don't plan to fail, they just fail to plan.
Good Luck.

Steven-SSD
01-25-2001, 05:21 AM
Wow hey Vir..thanks for that deep info on planning man.. yea but you see most companies wont go for those high-tech complex design for their site.. all they need is simple, stylish..and easy to navigate sites.. (which means not very much hard work to be plan into the project) but just the designing..

The amount range that sounds reasonable (also marketly) to charge for our work on flash sites is still unknown to me =)

Hey designing sites is always a profit business to us, dont it? cause the only cost we have is time =) and well your creative mind..

thatbillguy
01-25-2001, 05:39 AM
I haven't quite developed a black and white system of charging folks yet. I've been playing it by ear. When I first started my business, another designer gave me two bits of advice I've enjoyed practicing;
1. You're not charging for a physical piece of material, you're charging people for your creativity and what's in your head. What's that worth to you?
2. For difficult clients, add the "A.H." tax if necessary. (you'll figure it out).
-Bill

Seti
01-25-2001, 05:57 AM
Hi Steven,

difficult question! I've seen a lot of different prices for almost the same effort.

There are different factors involved, f.e. small/large business (client), how many html-pages would it be ?..

Here's an idea of what we do, we'll go to the client, give them the options, and let them decide what they want in the site. Mostly it's a html-site and a flash-site with intro.
In our company I'll do the flash, my associate does the html. For a small company, with a website of app. 20 html pages (+intro&flash), we charge about 4.000-5.000$ or euro (it's not that much difference right now). I've seen less, but also a lot more. You may not go to low, cause clients won't take you seriously, and you can't go to high, cause than you're ripping them off.

Something you have to consider also is that there are different prices in different countries. It's pretty normal that a site is going to cost more in f.e. Australia than in Kazachstan. (no offence)

So you see there are different factors involved!

Probably the best advice you got was the reply from Virtuoso !

CU

Kinomation
01-28-2001, 01:32 AM
Hey Seti I have a question for you. I'm from Australia and if charge a client here $1000 for a site and a client from overseas, say the UK wan'ts a site that requires the same amount of work can we charge them 1000 pounds (or what ever the currency in that country is)or the equivalent of $1000 Australian.

hiker
01-28-2001, 01:37 PM
just thought i'd jump into this -- having been an independant contractor (freelancer) for going on 12 years now (straight programming before the web started), i'd say you could take about all the comments above and combine them into the answer to your question. There is no real method that really works to estimate a good cost - the comment about estimating your hours and adding 1/3 is valid - as is the one about not being too low nor too high... but it does all come down to trying your best to figure out how long the job will take, and then multiplying by your hourly rate. If you don't have an hourly rate yet, then sit down and figure that out first. Most flash programmers are getting between $50 and $80 per hour, depending on location. Clients that want a flat-rate instead of an hourly rate, you still try to figure out how many hours it takes, and mulitiply - although on flat rates, i tend to bump the price up a bit to cover unforseen circumstances (i truly feel a straight hourly rate is better for both parties - but some clients are difficult to convince of that). Whether you are billing the client by the hour or by the job - it still depends on how many hours it will take by how much you charge. and yes, if you do a job for a client overseas, you still charge based on *your* home rates - you can't work for less just because the rupee (or whatever) is worth less than a $ - you just convert to whatever the clients local currency is. bottom line is just don't sell yourself short - especially when you are just starting out - while you may not command top dollar as a novice - if you are capable of producing professional quality work, it is worth professional prices (even if your 14!). don't give it away just because you don't have a deep portfolio or because you're new at the game. and if you can't produce professional quality work yet, then you have no business trying to sell it to clients in the first place. just my opinions.

:)

Steven-SSD
01-28-2001, 05:13 PM
Hey guys..thanks for the good infos.. I agree with hiker on this : "bottom line is just don't sell yourself short - especially when you are just starting out - while you may not command top dollar as a novice - if you are capable of producing professional quality work, it is worth professional prices (even if your 14!). don't give it away just because you don't have a deep portfolio or because you're new at the game. and if you can't produce professional quality work yet, then you have no business trying to sell it to clients in the first place." Definately a good point. I've seen some ppl charging ridiculasly on sites whose designs are not even proffesional.

Seti and the others thanks for that infos .. U've given me a good range to think about with =)

Kraken
01-29-2001, 06:54 PM
Ok, I'm about to embark upon legalizing my whole in-home operation. I'm planning on getting a real, honest-to-goodness business license and all that goes with it.

What are the caveats here? What are some book-based/online resources for more info on setting this up? Obviously, there are specifics to where I live on this whole thing, but what are the general pitfalls and problems and good things I should look out for here?

thanks,
Rich