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Thread: Good guitar to learn on

  1. #1
    Retired SCORM Guru PAlexC's Avatar
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    Good guitar to learn on

    So I need another musical hobby as it's been ages. Thinking about guitar just 'cause it doesn't take up a lot of room, and I can pick it up and fiddle with it whenever I want.

    What's a good one to learn on?
    "What really bugs me is that my mom had the audacity to call Flash Kit a bunch of 'inept jack-asses'." - sk8Krog
    ...and now I have tape all over my face.

  2. #2
    Retired Mod aversion's Avatar
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    The easiest guitar to play is a nylon string guitar I think. The fret board is wider and the tension in the strings far less than in a steel stringed guitar.

    It sounds ok but obviously it's not ideally suited to rock or pop, but I think it's the easiest way to get used to fingering and moving about the fret board. When you graduate to a steel string guitar you'll have to readjust a bit but overall you learn faster because you get better results and more confidence faster. Plus you can buy a perfectly good nylon string yamaha to learn on for 100 quid, they cost a lot less to make than steel string 'folk' guitars because they require a lot less bracing.

  3. #3
    An Inconvenient Serving Size hurricaneone's Avatar
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    Originally posted by aversion
    Plus you can buy a perfectly good nylon string yamaha to learn on for 100 quid, they cost a lot less to make than steel string 'folk' guitars because they require a lot less bracing.
    Don't go too cheap, or else the sound you'll get will put you off playing guitar for just about ever.
    Stand by for emergency synapse rerouting

  4. #4
    Retired Mod aversion's Avatar
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    Originally posted by hurricaneone
    Don't go too cheap, or else the sound you'll get will put you off playing guitar for just about ever.
    I agree, but a good steel string will put you back at least $400 for something well-made and solid wood.

    the 100 quid yamaha I had was as good a quality as you'll get for a sub 500 buck nylon string guit though. I still play it now, it's on the wall next to my gibson, fender and taylor

  5. #5
    Retired SCORM Guru PAlexC's Avatar
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    Um....what?
    "What really bugs me is that my mom had the audacity to call Flash Kit a bunch of 'inept jack-asses'." - sk8Krog
    ...and now I have tape all over my face.

  6. #6
    Hairy Member robbmcaulay's Avatar
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    Hey, this is a nice one...

    http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/...se_pid/518657/

    Nylon strings, definately easier to learn on...

    It'll only take you a few months til' you want a proper acoustic, so try looking for a cheaper one...

    To find them on that site ^ I type 'nylon guitar' in the search box...

    Hope this helps, Robb
    "Wah wah wah Dorothy Parker wah wah wah" - hanratty21

  7. #7
    Total Universe Mod jAQUAN's Avatar
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    get a good digital tuner, it will save you tons of guessing. I actually learned most of the few things I can play from tablature. www.tabcrawler.com is a good place.

  8. #8
    Retired Mod aversion's Avatar
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    Originally posted by PAlexC
    Um....what?
    what don't you comprehend?

    nylon string guitars are like spanish 'flamenco' guitars, the strings are made of nylon fibre which can be strung with a much lower tension.

    steel string guitars are 'folk' type guitars, the 'normal' guitars you'll see everywhere. The steel strings have a very high tension and the body of the guitar requires a lot of bracing so it doesn't warp under the pull of the strings.

  9. #9
    no noise means no bees xup878's Avatar
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    god i've met so many people with guitars that blow mine away because they decided it would be a good thing to learn, then found out it was hard so they quit...

    buy a cheap guitar, if you dont like it, or just cant be bothered, at least then u haven't wasted any money...

  10. #10
    Retired SCORM Guru PAlexC's Avatar
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    I tinkered around in college with an old yamaha a buddy of mine had. (He had just bought a nice fender.) I just didn't have the time then.

    Thanks for explaining the strings.

    I kind of want an electric, just so I don't have to buy another one later. (Distortion == goodness.) If I don't stick with it, I'll sell it, that's all.
    "What really bugs me is that my mom had the audacity to call Flash Kit a bunch of 'inept jack-asses'." - sk8Krog
    ...and now I have tape all over my face.

  11. #11
    PAZ nordberg's Avatar
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    if you really want to learn how to play, get an acoustic. with an electric, you will be much less likely to just pick it up and fiddle around with it. plus with the acoustic, you can take it anywhere inside or outside. it's also easier to teach yourself to play AND sing on an acoustic - as long as you're learning, you might as well make it 2 for 1. plus, i have found endless joy learning acoustic versions of heavier songs...

    yes, distortion is goodness, but it's a much smaller commitment in equipment to get an acoustic...

    Ah, these boys is all swelled up. So this was earlier...getting set to trade. Then, woooaaah differences.
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  12. #12
    Retired Mod aversion's Avatar
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    yah, getting an electric is, in some ways, like only learning to drive an automatic. Acoustic's are much less forgiving and the whole technical side of gettign the right sound out of an electric guitar is something best tackled after you know how to play I think.

  13. #13
    Retired SCORM Guru PAlexC's Avatar
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    Damn you and your good arguments.
    "What really bugs me is that my mom had the audacity to call Flash Kit a bunch of 'inept jack-asses'." - sk8Krog
    ...and now I have tape all over my face.

  14. #14
    I'm the good one! XU1's Avatar
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    If you start playing, sometime down the track you'l try a few different guitars, I had a nylon string for years and I found its only suited for classical styles, but some people can make anything sound good.

    I've got a Washburn Electric with Peavey amp and Korg processor set up, but for the last 4 years I've gone to a LKSM Taylor 12 string guitar.

    Once I bought the Taylor I couldnt play any other guitar, I'm hoping to get a Baby Taylor one day, They are the best.

    Which ever way you go, you have to persist in it, and as someone said...dont go cheap, save for a decent guitar preferably a brand that a muso would use on the stage, if you cant afford it go second hand.

    Tony

    Tony

  15. #15
    Running Plodding & Limping SpockBert's Avatar
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    Originally posted by hurricaneone
    Don't go too cheap, or else the sound you'll get will put you off playing guitar for just about ever.
    yup. good advice

    what I would have said had I got here earlier

    I'm sure loads of people are put off playing after starting off with a crap guitar that goes out of tune every 2 mins.

    When I started playing it was on other people's guitars, but everything always sounded like crap and i was constantly retuning it. The day you spend a little money and get something decent is the single best thing you can do to learn.

    Its like a car, the more expensive ones are always far easier to drive

    you don't have to break the bank but if you go for the electric option get one that has a locking nut.

  16. #16
    Running Plodding & Limping SpockBert's Avatar
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    my first geeeeetar http://www.chrisguitars.com/bcrich99warlock-bk.jpg

    not this actual one, but same model and colour, check out those spikes

  17. #17
    Retired Mod aversion's Avatar
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    Originally posted by XU1
    If you start playing, sometime down the track you'l try a few different guitars, I had a nylon string for years and I found its only suited for classical styles, but some people can make anything sound good.

    I've got a Washburn Electric with Peavey amp and Korg processor set up, but for the last 4 years I've gone to a LKSM Taylor 12 string guitar.

    Once I bought the Taylor I couldnt play any other guitar, I'm hoping to get a Baby Taylor one day, They are the best.

    Which ever way you go, you have to persist in it, and as someone said...dont go cheap, save for a decent guitar preferably a brand that a muso would use on the stage, if you cant afford it go second hand.
    I agree about the taylor, I have one too, but I wouldn't say you have to spend a lot of money, I think it depends on the individual.

    My first guitar was 20 quid and I learnt all the basics on it before buying a fender acoustic, then a yamaha and finally a taylor. Getting the taylor was a huge pay off for all those years of learning.

  18. #18
    I'm the good one! XU1's Avatar
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    Originally posted by aversion
    I agree about the taylor, I have one too, but I wouldn't say you have to spend a lot of money, I think it depends on the individual.

    My first guitar was 20 quid and I learnt all the basics on it before buying a fender acoustic, then a yamaha and finally a taylor. Getting the taylor was a huge pay off for all those years of learning.
    I see you got good taste as well, yeah your'e right about spending big bucks, when I was younger, I had heaps of crap guitars (pretty much like my playing. )but once I made the leap to a decent brand name that was it, more inspiration, and determination.

    Taylors arent cheap, my LKSM 12 was about $2,500 US, but damn have they got a good sound...keep plukin'.

    Tony

  19. #19
    Anything. Anytime. Anywhere. aliensynergy's Avatar
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    I am going against everyone, get an electric. The action [string height off the fret board] is generally MUCH MUCH lower than on any acoustic [nylon string guitars generally have the highest!].

    And of course electric guitars sound much "cooler" to beginners, you ain't got no distortion with an acoustic. When someone begins to learn flash, would you recommend they jump right into actionscripting or play around with the cool fun stuff to keep them interested?

    Ibanez make some very cheap, easy to play beginner guitars. That's what I started on 13 years ago, now I have about 15k worth of amps guitars and recording gear, including two custom Ibanez's. Be careful or you too will end up a guitar freak.


    synergy:theory
    it'll be finished someday.

  20. #20
    I'd have to disagree with one of the above suggestions to get a nylon string. (Unless it is happens to be one of those nice standard acoustic body Taylor's that use nylon strings). Classical guitar necks are much wider and harder to play on, which, in my opinion, outweighs the advantage of the nylon strings.

    My suggestion? Get a regular acoustic/electric guitar with steel strings. Sure, the strings might be a pain in the beginning, but your fingers will adapt, and you should have no problem switching to electric once you get some skill. Additionally, they are making some acoustic/electrics with built in tuners (my Ovation has one), which is very convenient for players on all levels.



    h
    Last edited by hockyfan; 03-30-2004 at 11:15 PM.
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